HISTORIAS QUE NACEN DE LA VIDA REAL - MODELO: ENMÁRCALO -

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Escrito por:

Judith Black

Fecha:

2015-09-01

Hace un par de semanas contacté a la storyteller, profesora y coach Judith Black, creadora y narradora de historias durante más de 30 años.  Judith ha participado en escenarios como el festival de comedia de Montreal, el festival nacional de Storytelling, la universidad hebrea en Jerusalén, el museo de arte nacional de Cape Town.  También ha creado historias para el departamento del interior de Estados Unidos, la fundación Mass para las humanidades y muchas otras.  Cuenta con un título en educación para la temprana edad y fue profesora adjunta en la universidad de Lesley por más de 25 años.  Pueden conocer más acerca de ella y su trabajo en:

www.storiesalive.com 

www.tellingstoriestochildren.com 

Judith me dio una lista de posibles temas, y seleccioné  “Creando historias desde tú vida”

Me envío una pieza fascinante titulada “Historias que nacen de la vida real, realmente bien escrita y con historias que tienen muy buen ritmo.  En esta Judith ofrece 4 modelos con los cuales podemos transformar nuestras experiencias en historias para audiencias más grandes. 

Voy a mostrar un modelo por post.  EL primero se llama “Enmárcalo”: “Usted sabe que una experiencia tuvo resonancia para usted.  Enmárquela en la razón de esa resonancia y obtendrá una historia.  

Judith utiliza este modelo en la historia que relata. 

 

STORIES BORN OF REAL LIFE       

 

Some weeks ago I contacted the storyteller, professor and coach Judith Black; creator and teller of tales for over 30 years.  Judith has been featured on stages such as The Montreal Comedy Festival, The National Storytelling Festival, The Smithsonian Institution, Hebrew University in Jerusalem, the National Art Museum in Cape Town. She has also created stories for the US Department of the Interior, NPR, The Mass. Foundation for the Humanities, and many others.  She holds a degree in Early Childhood Education and was an adjunct faculty member at Lesley University for over twenty-five years.  To learn more about her and her work you can visit:

www.storiesalive.com 

www.tellingstoriestochildren.com 

Judith gave me a list of possible themes and I decided to pick “Creating stories from your life”

She sent me a fascinating piece titled “Stories Born of Real Life” that is really well written, and has nice stories with a good pace.  In her piece Judith offers 4 models by which we get to transform our experiences into stories for larger audiences.   

I´m going to showcase one model per post.  The first one is the “FRAME IT” model: “You know that an experience has resonance for you. Frame it in the reason for that resonance and you have a tale.” 

Judith uses this model in the following story:

 

THE PRUNE PIT

As a child I asked my mother for the same anecdote at least a million times:

"Mommy mommy, tell me the prune pit story!"

"Oh, I´ve told you that silly story a million times."

"Pleeeeeeeease."

"Oh O.K. When i was a little girl we all did the long fast for Yom Kippur (the Jewish Day of Atonement, 22-26 hours sans food and drink). Oh, I got so hungry that by three o´clock, I couldn´t stand it. So, I ate a few prunes and hid the pits behind the couch. At 5, just before it was time to go back to the synagogue, I heard my mother call out ´Helen Edith Gruskin!´Oh, I knew I was in trouble when my mother used my middle name. There she was standing with the couch pushed out and the prune pits in her hand! How did she know?"

That was it, not a five part thriller, but I asked for it endlessly. It would mean between little and nothing to others, until I could figure out why it resonated for me and then used that understanding as a frame. Why was this anecdote so important? Only as an adult can I now look back and understand what it represented. 

As a child, I was my mother´s great failure. She was perfection. Her hair curled perfectly into a lovely face. Mine hung like a sheep dogs over undistinguished eyes with a too big nose peeking out. Her figure was that of a Hollywood starlet. I was always chubby. Her kitchen and public rooms were neat as a pins and so clean you eat off of any surface. The floor of my room became visible only under threat of evacuation. She would always look at me and shake her head sadly. We seemed like different species.

There was this one story I would ask for endlessly.

"Mommy mommy, tell me the prune pit story!"

"Oh, I´ve told you that silly story a million times."

"Pleeeeeeeease."

"Oh O.K. When i was a little girl we all did the long fast for Yom Kippur (the Jewish Day of atonement, 22-26 hours sans food and drink). Oh, i got so hungry by three O´clock, i couldn´t stand it. So, i ate a few prunes and hid the pits behind the couch. At 5, just before it was time to go back to the synagogue, i heard my mother call out ´Helen Edith Gruskin!´ Oh, I knew I was in trouble when my mother used my middle name. There she was standing with couch pushed out the prune pits in her hand! How did she know?" 

Ha, my mother did have a weakness, a failing! There was a chink in her armor. Maybe there was room yet for me to grow into perfection!

 

Many of us have felt diminished when standing next to our parental role models. For anyone with this or a similar experience, this story will now resonate with them and bring up their memories, thoughts, and tales of survival. It is no longer an idiosyncratic experience, but now a story that links to the experience of others.          

 

Judith Black 

Storyteller/Teacher/Coach